Ophthalmic Texts in English from Before 1800.

Links: Christopher T. Leffler, MD, MPH.

1267.

Opus Majus. by Friar Roger Bacon. 1267.  1962 translation by Robert Belle Burke.  [on page 574 of this 1962 translation is text regarding benefit of magnifying glasses for vision.  Can be found by searching for “spherical medium”.  Also page 582-3 (search for the words “giant” and “combustion.”]  [Earlier translation by J.H. Bridge, MD, 1897.]

1587.

A work touching the preseruation of the sight, set forth by VV. Bailey. [Walter Bailey] D. of Phisick. [London]: Printed by Robert Waldegraue for Thomas Man and VVilliam Brome, [1587?]

A Worthy Treatise of the Eyes. Translation by Anthony Hunton of Jacques Guillemeau. [London]: Printed by Robert Waldegraue for Thomas Man and VVilliam Brome, [1587?]

1589.

An ANTIDOTARIE Chyrurgicall.  By Iohn Banester [John Banister].  Imprinted at London by Thomas Orwin for Thomas Man.  1589.

1599.

A Discourse of the Preservation of the Sight: of Melancholike diseases; of Rheumes, and of Old age. By Andre DuLaurens. Translated by Richard Surphlet. 1599.

1615.

The Vanitie of the Eye. by George Hakewill. 1615.

1652.

The Method of Physick.  By Philip Barrough. London. Printed by Abraham Miller, and are to be sold by John Blague and Samuel Howes, 1652.

1667.

An Observation Concerning a Blemish in an Horses Eye, Not Hitherto Discover’d by Any Author, Which May be of Great Use in the Choice of an Horse to Those Who are Curious; Made by Dr. Richard Lower at the Royal Society, January 23. 1667/8. By Richard Lower. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1666-1667;2:613–614.

1668.

A new discovery touching vision. by Prior Edme Mariotte. Translation by Justel. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1668;3:668-671.  [This is Mariotte’s discovery of the blind spot.]

Two Extracts of Letters, Concerning an Opticall Experiment, Conducive to a Decay’d Sight, Together with Some Notes, Referring to the Observations about a Blemish in Horse-Eyes, Publisht Numb. 32. A Remarque Touching the Greater.  [Author listed as “Communicated by a Worthy Person.”] Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1668;3:727-31.

1684.

Two Letters from the Great, and Experienced Oculist, Dr. Turbervile of Salisbury, to Mr. William Musgrave S. P. S. of Oxon, Containing Several Remarkable Cases in Physick, Relating Chiefly to the Eyes. Turbervile, D Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. January 1, 1684.  14:736–738.

A Letter from Mr. Anthony Leewenhoeck Fellow of the Royal Society, Dat. Apr. 14. 1684. Containing Observations about the Cristallin Humor of the Eye, etc. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (1683-1775). 1684;14:780–789.

1698.

Part of a Letter from Mr. Anthony van Leeuwenhoek, F. R. S. Concerning the Eyes of Beetles, etc. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1698. 20:169–175.

1700.

A Letter from Mr Charles King to Mr Sam. Doudy, F. R. S. concerning Crabs Eyes. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1700; 22: 672–673.

1702.

An Extract of a Letter to Dr Edward Tyson from the Reverend Mr Charles Ellis, Giving an Account of a Young Lady, Born Deaf and Dumb, Taught to Speak. That Costerus First Invented Printing, Anno 1430. Of the Physick Garden at Amsterdam, and the Chamber of Rarities at Boln. Of a Monstrout Birth. Of the Quarry at Maestricht. Fr. Linus’s Dyals at Leige. The Cachot or Rooms Cut in the Rock of the Castle in Namur. Sir Jo. Mandevil’s Tomb at Leige. The Friesland Boy with Letters in His Eye. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.  1702; 23:1416–1418.

1704.

A Letter from Mr Antony Van Leeuwenhoek, F. R. S. concerning the Flesh of Whales, Crystalinc Humour of the Eye of Whales, Fish, and Other Creatures, and of the Use of the Eye-Lids. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1704; 24: 1723–1730.

1709.

An essay towards a new theory of vision. By George Berkeley [1685-1753]. Dublin: printed by Aaron Rhames, for Jeremy Pepyat, 1709.

1713.

Ophthalmographia. Or a Treatise of the Eye. By Peter Kennedy.    1713.

1717.

A Way for Myopes to Use Telescopes without Eye-Glasses, an Object Glass Alone Becoming as Useful to Them, and Sometimes More Than a Combination of Glasses. Communicated to the Royal-Society, by the Reverend J. T. Desaguliers, LL.D. and F. R. S.  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1717-1719;30:1017-1021.

1731.

A Letter from Mr. Jac. Theod. Klein, Secret. Dan. & F. R. S. to Sir Hans Sloane Bart. Pr. R. S. &c. Serving to Accompany the Pictures of a Very Extraordinary Fossile Skull of an Ox with the Cores of the Horns; Of the Plica Polonica Mentioned in Transact. No 417; And of a Very Large Tumor of the Eye. Translated from the Latin by T. S. M. D. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1731; 37:427–429.

1722.

An Account of Two Observations upon the Cataract of the Eye; Contain’d in a Letter from Signor Antonio Benevoli, Master-Surgeon in the Hospital of S. Maria Nuova in Florence, to Dr. Valsalva; Printed in Italian at Florence, This Present Year, and Communicated to the Royal Society, at the Desire of the Author, by Sir Thomas Dereham, F. R. S. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1722; 32:194–196.

1724.

An Account of the Dissection of an Eye with a Cataract. By Mr. John Ranby, Surgeon. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1724; 33:36–37.

1728.

An Account of Some Observations Made by a Young Gentleman, Who Was Born Blind, or Lost His Sight so Early, That He Had no Remembrance of Ever Having Seen, and Was Couch d between 13 and 14 Years of Age. By Mr. Will. Chesselden, F. R. S. Surgeon to Her Majesty, and to St. Thomas’s Hospital. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1727-8; 35:447-50.

An Explication of the Instruments Used, in a New Operation on the Eyes, by the Same [by William Chesselden]. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1727-8; 35:451–452.

1732.

Alciphron: or, the minute philosopher. In seven dialogues. Containing an apology for the Christian religion, against those who are called free-thinkers… by George Berkeley [1685-1753]. Dublin: printed for G. Risk, G. Ewing, and W. Smith. 1732.

1737.

Extract of a Letter from Dr. Andrew Cantwell of Montpelier, to Dr. Thomas Stack, Dated June 23. 1732. concerning an Uncommon Palsey of the Eye-Lids.  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1737-1738; 40: 311-312.

1739.

Supplement to Kennedy’s Ophthalmographia; Or, Treatise of the Eye. By Peter Kennedy. 1739.  [Keywords: Porterfield, Cheselden, Bracken].

The Case of a Wound in the Cornea of the Eye Being Successfully Cured by Mr. Tho. Baker, Surgeon to St. Thomas’s Hospital, and by Him Communicated to the Royal Society, in a Letter to Dr. Mortimer, R. S. Secr. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1739; 41:135–136.

1741.

A Description of Needles Made for Operations on the Eyes, and of Some Instruments for the Ears, by the Same.  [by Archibald Cleland.] Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1741; 41:847–851.

1744.

An Account of a Remarkable Cure, Performed on the Eye of a Young Woman in Scotland, by Tho. Hope, M. D. Communicated from Dr. Mead.  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1744-1745;43: 194–200.

1745.  

An account of a most efficacious medicine for soreness, weakness, and several other distempers of the eyes.  By Hans Sloane (1660-1753).  London : Printed for Dan. Browne,at the Black-Swan, without Temple-Bar. 1745.

1750.

A short account of the nature and use of spectacles. In which is recommended, a kind of glass for spectacles, … By James Ayscough. London. 1750.

A new treatise on the glaucoma, or cataract. By Sylvester O’Halloran [1728-1807]. Dublin : Printed by S. Powell, in Crane-lane. 1750.

1753.

Observations on the cure of William Taylor, the blind boy of Ightham, in Kent; who being born with cataracts in both eyes, was at eight years of age, brought to sight, on the 8th of October, 1751, by Mr. John Taylor, jun. oculist, … Also some address to the publick, for a contribution towards the foundation of an Hospital for the blind, already begun by some noble personages: By William Oldys [1696-1761]. [London]: Printed by E. Owen, in Hand-Court, Holborn. 1753.

1755.

A Remarkable Case of a Morbid Eye: By Mr. Edward Spry, Surgeon, at Plymouth, in Devonshire.  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1755; 49:18–21.

A Dissertation upon the Cancer of the Eye-Lids, Nose, Great Angle of the Eye, and Its Neighbouring Parts, Commonly Called the Noli-Me-Tangere, Deemed Hitherto Incureable by Both Antients and Moderns, but Now Shewn to be as Curable as Other Distempers. Addressed to the Royal Society of London by Mons. Daviel, Consulting Surgeon in Ordinary, and Oculist to the King; Master of Arts, and of Surgery at Marseilles; Royal Professor and Demonstrator of Anatomy of the Same City; Member of the Academy of Sciences of Toulose, Bologne, and That of Surgery of Paris; And Translated from the French by James Parsons, M. D. and F. R. S.  Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London.  1755; 49:186–196.

1757.

An Account of an Extraordinary Case of a Diseased Eye: In a Letter to Matthew Maty, M. D. F. R. S. By Daniel Peter Layard, M. D. F. R. S. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. 1757; 50:747–753.

1759.

A treatise on the eye, the manner and phaenomena of vision : in two volumes. By William Porterfield. Edinburgh : Printed for A. Miller at London, and for G. Hamilton and J. Balfour at Edinburgh. 1759.

1764.

Essays on medical subjects : originally printed separately; to which is now prefixed an introduction relating to the use of hemlock and corrosive sublimate; and to the application of caustic medicines in cancerous disorders. By Thomas Gataker. (died 1769).  London : Printed for R. and J. Dodsley.  1764.  [The third of three essays in the book discusses depression versus extraction for cataract.]

1773.

A description of the human eye, and its adjacent parts : together with their principal diseases and the methods proposed for relieving them.  By Joseph Warner [1717-1801]. London : Printed for Lockyer Davis, in Holborn, printer to the Royal Society. 1773.

1776.

A survey of experimental philosophy, considered in its present state of improvement. Illustrated with cuts. … By Oliver Goldsmith, M.B [1730?-1774].  London: printed for T. Carnan and F. Newbery jun. 1776.

1780.

A treatise on the diseases of the eye and their remedies : to which is prefixed, the anatomy of the eye, the theory of vision, and the several species of imperfect sight : illustrated with copper plates. By George Chandler. London: Printed for T. Cadell, in the Strand. 1780.

Remarks on the ophthalmy, psorophthalmy, and purulent eye : with methods of cure, considerably different from those commonly used : and cases annexed, in proof of their utility.  By James Ware [1756-1815]. London : Printed for Charles Dilly, in the Poultry. 1780.

1782.

A Microscopic Description of the Eyes of the Monoculus Polyphemus Linnaei. By Mr. William Andre, Surgeon; Communicated by Sir Joseph Banks, Bart. P. R. S. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London (1776-1886). Jan 1, 1782. 72:440–444.

1784.

Benjamin Franklin’s letters on double spectacles (bifocals) to George Whatley. 1784-1785.

1785.

Natural history: general and particular, by the Count de Buffon [Georges Louis Leclerc Buffon], translated into English. Illustrated with above 260 copper-plates, and occasional notes and observations by the translator.  Edinburgh: printed for William Creech. [Translated by William Smellie].1780-85.  [Section VI deals with vision.]

1788.

Surgical tracts, containing a treatise upon ulcers of the legs : in which former methods of treatment are candidly examined, and compared with one more rational and safe; effected without rest and confinement : together with hints on a successful method of treating some scrophulous tumours; the mammary abscess, and sore nipples of lying-in women; observations on the more common disorders of the eye, and on gangrene. By Michael Underwood [1736-1820]. Second Ed. London: Printed for J. Mathews, no. 18, Strand. 1788.

1792.

An essay on vision : briefly explaining the fabric of the eye and the nature of vision, intended for the service of those whose eyes are weak or impaired. By George Adams [1750-1795]. London : printed for the author, by R. Hindmarsh.  1792.

An essay upon single vision with two eyes : together with experiments and observations on several other subjects in optics. By William Charles Wells [1757-1817] London : Printed for T. Cadell, in the Strand. 1792.

1793.

A treatise on the extraction of the cataract. By Frederick Bischoff. 1793.

1794.

Zoonomia: or, the laws of organic life. … By Erasmus Darwin [1731-1802]. London: printed for J. Johnson, 1794-96.

1795.

An enquiry into the causes which have most commonly prevented success in the operation of extracting the cataract : with an account of the means by which they may either be avoided or rectified : to which are added, observations on the dissipation of the cataract, and on the cure of the gutta serena : also, additional remarks on the epiphora, or, watery eye : the whole illustrated with a variety of cases. By James Ware [1756-1815] London: Printed for C. Dilly in the Poultry; H. Murray, no. 32 Fleetstreet, and J. Walter, Charing-Cross. 1795.

Observations on the Structure of the Eyes of Birds. By Mr. Pierce Smith, Student of Physic. Communicated by George Pearson, M. D. F. R. S. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Societyof London. January 1, 1795. 85:263-269.

1796.

Observations on the nature and theory of vision : with an inquiry into the cause of the single appearance of objects seen by both eyes. By John Crisp. London : Printed for J. Sewell, no. 32, Cornhill. 1796.

1797.

The Croonian Lecture. In Which Some of the Morbid Actions of the Straight Muscles and Cornea of the Eye are Explained, and Their Treatment Considered. By Everard Home, Esq. F. R. S. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. January 1, 1797. 87: 1-28.

1798.

Extraordinary facts relating to the vision of colours: with observations.  By Mr. John Dalton. Read Oct. 31st, 1794.  Memoirs of the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester. 1798; 5: 28-45.

An Account of the Orifice in the Retina of the Human Eye, Discovered by Professor Soemmering. To Which are Added, Proofs of This Appearance Being Extended to the Eyes of Other Animals. By Everard Home, Esq. F. R. S. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Societyof London. Jan 1, 1798. 88:332–345.

1799.

Surgical tracts, containing a treatise upon ulcers of the legs : in which former methods of treatment are candidly examined, and compared with one more rational and safe; effected without rest and confinement : together with hints on a successful method of treating some scrophulous tumours; the mammary abscess, and sore nipples of lying-in women; observations on the more common disorders of the eye, and on gangrene. By Michael Underwood [1736-1820]. Third Ed. London : Printed for J. Mathews, no. 18, Strand. 1799.

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